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There are hundreds of organisations with thousands of activities each year in Eumundi and its hinterland: music, landcare, aged-care, animal welfare, theatre, local issues, history groups, women’s and men’s groups, schools’ and children’s groups, festivals, service clubs, educational, sport and recreation clubs…and more!

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9 hours ago

Meet a local – Rosanna Natoli
The word 'mayor' comes from the French word ‘maire’ – meaning ‘greatest’ or ‘superior’– and is applied to the head man of a village, town or city community.
It came to England with the Norman Conquest in 1066. Following British tradition, Australian mayors are elected through popular ballot at local government elections or a vote amongst councillors. Large cities may elect a Lord Mayor with Royal approval.
Former journalist and TV presenter Rosanna Natoli was recently elected Mayor of Sunshine Coast Council. Rosanna’s Italian parents farmed sugar cane in Bundaberg. Educated in Brisbane, she gained a science degree but realised her interest in current affairs and helping people was better served through journalism.
While waitressing at a lavish wedding at The Sheraton, a guest was impressed by her pronunciation of “prosciutto” and insisted she meet his son Joe who she married in 1989, spending time overseas before moving to the Sunshine Coast.
They ran a restaurant called Tivoli in Caloundra before Joe became a councillor and was Sunshine Coast Mayor for four years. Rosanna did work experience with Sunshine TV, filling in as a ‘temp’ and eventually working full time, travelling to Bundaberg then Maryborough each week and returning home on weekends. The opening of a station in Maroochydore meant a more stable home life and she welcomed two daughters, Ruby and Mia, and a son Roman.
As a popular newsreader on Channel 7, Rosanna is familiar to many people. She is heavily involved in the community and an avid supporter of numerous organisations and charities. In her role as Mayor she can give a voice to those not being heard, especially in hinterland communities. “It’s a natural progression from the many connections I already have and will bring me new relationships.”
“The Sunshine Coast has grown so quickly with more people coming. At present we haven’t got sufficient infrastructure, especially in transport and roads. We must ensure our lifestyle is maintained.”
Rosanna is committed to being open and available. She walks every morning near a beach on weekends, is passionate about the arts, loves singing and theatre, enjoys coffee time with friends and promises she will be visible.
Although the budget is already made, Rosanna wants to ensure that changes to the basics are relevant improvements and visible to the public. Her husband Joe was re-elected as a Division 4 Councillor.
After 29 years no more news reading!

Sunshine Coast Council
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Meet a local – Rosanna Natoli
The word mayor comes from the French word ‘maire’ – meaning ‘greatest’ or ‘superior’– and is applied to the head man of a village, town or city community. 
It came to England with the Norman Conquest in 1066. Following British tradition, Australian mayors are elected through popular ballot at local government elections or a vote amongst councillors. Large cities may elect a Lord Mayor with Royal approval.
Former journalist and TV presenter Rosanna Natoli was recently elected Mayor of Sunshine Coast Council. Rosanna’s Italian parents farmed sugar cane in Bundaberg. Educated in Brisbane, she gained a science degree but realised her interest in current affairs and helping people was better served through journalism. 
While waitressing at a lavish wedding at The Sheraton, a guest was impressed by her pronunciation of “prosciutto” and insisted she meet his son Joe who she married in 1989, spending time overseas before moving to the Sunshine Coast. 
They ran a restaurant called Tivoli in Caloundra before Joe became a councillor and was Sunshine Coast Mayor for four years. Rosanna did work experience with Sunshine TV, filling in as a ‘temp’ and eventually working full time, travelling to Bundaberg then Maryborough each week and returning home on weekends. The opening of a station in Maroochydore meant a more stable home life and she welcomed two daughters, Ruby and Mia, and a son Roman. 
As a popular newsreader on Channel 7, Rosanna is familiar to many people. She is heavily involved in the community and an avid supporter of numerous organisations and charities. In her role as Mayor she can give a voice to those not being heard, especially in hinterland communities. “It’s a natural progression from the many connections I already have and will bring me new relationships.”
“The Sunshine Coast has grown so quickly with more people coming. At present we haven’t got sufficient infrastructure, especially in transport and roads. We must ensure our lifestyle is maintained.”
Rosanna is committed to being open and available. She walks every morning near a beach on weekends, is passionate about the arts, loves singing and theatre, enjoys coffee time with friends and promises she will be visible. 
Although the budget is already made, Rosanna wants to ensure that changes to the basics are relevant improvements and visible to the public. Her husband Joe was re-elected as a Division 4 Councillor.
After 29 years no more news reading! 

Sunshine Coast Council

Watch this space…..I have had a lot of questions about works on the Eumundi Noosa Road at the bridge over the North Maroochy River.
It is geotechnical drilling and investigations to finalise the design and engineering for the bridge.
Eumundi Chamber of Commerce Inc
Eumundi Voice
4562 Eumundi Online Mag
Eumundi Museum
EUMUNDI Business Hub
Eumundi Community
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Watch this space…..

Domestic and Family Violence (DFV) is increasing in our community, with fear and physical assaults stemming from control, dominance and anger issues. The figures for two years (2022-2023) show DFV incidents totalled 1,474 in Noosa, 426 in Eumundi and 331 in Cooroy.

Five Rotary clubs – Noosa Rotary, Rotary Club of Cooroy Queensland, Rotary Noosa Daybreak, Noosa Heads and Eumundi Rotary Club – have joined together to broaden understanding of the impact of DFV and stimulate community action. More than 80 people attended a seminar at Cooroy Memorial Hall on 18 April and heard from police members A/SenSgt Ryan Hanlon, A/Sgt Craig McKenzie and Sgt Marie O’Brien about the prevalence of DFV and its impact.
A/Sgt McKenzie explained the complexity of ‘relevant relationships’ and the terms ‘respondent’ and ‘aggrieved’. He outlined the range of abuse that can be addressed under law including emotional, financial and physical threats, and direct violence.

Sgt O’Brien outlined the Vulnerable Persons Unit's work and focus on prevention. One in six women report DFV from a cohabiting partner and it’s estimated that 80% of events are not reported. She described how police utilise the skills of community agencies such as Centacare, DVConnect Mensline and Queensland Health to help victims caught up in a repetitive cycle and hold perpetrators accountable as “no one organisation can cope with the scale of DFV”.

During question time, the personal stories of some who have experienced DFV brought home the immediacy and magnitude of the problem. Rotary for Mental Health (R4MH) groups continue to increase awareness and action by the whole community with more events planned.
... See MoreSee Less

Domestic and Family Violence (DFV) is increasing in our community, with fear and physical assaults stemming from control, dominance and anger issues. The figures for two years (2022-2023) show DFV incidents totalled 1,474 in Noosa, 426 in Eumundi and 331 in Cooroy.

Five Rotary clubs – Noosa Rotary, Rotary Club of Cooroy Queensland, Rotary Noosa Daybreak, Noosa Heads and Eumundi Rotary Club – have joined together to broaden understanding of the impact of DFV and stimulate community action. More than 80 people attended a seminar at Cooroy Memorial Hall on 18 April and heard from police members A/SenSgt Ryan Hanlon, A/Sgt Craig McKenzie and Sgt Marie O’Brien about the prevalence of DFV and its impact.  
A/Sgt McKenzie explained the complexity of ‘relevant relationships’ and the terms ‘respondent’ and ‘aggrieved’. He outlined the range of abuse that can be addressed under law including emotional, financial and physical threats, and direct violence.

Sgt O’Brien outlined the Vulnerable Persons Units work and focus on prevention. One in six women report DFV from a cohabiting partner and it’s estimated that 80% of events are not reported. She described how police utilise the skills of community agencies such as Centacare, DVConnect Mensline and Queensland Health  to help victims caught up in a repetitive cycle and hold perpetrators accountable as “no one organisation can cope with the scale of DFV”.

During question time, the personal stories of some who have experienced DFV brought home the immediacy and magnitude of the problem. Rotary for Mental Health (R4MH) groups continue to increase awareness and action by the whole community with more events planned.
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Eumundi QLD 4562

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